Langar

On the Olympic trail: ‘Langars’ in London for Fauja Singh’s torch run

While Fauja Singh – the 101- year-old marathon runner – carries the Olympic relay torch in London on July 21, Sikhs would celebrate the occasion by organising a langar (community kitchen) along the road for the public.

They would serve free roti rolls at several key points along the Olympic torch route from Greenwich Park to Waltham Forest Town Hall between 7 am (12.30 pm IST) to 8 pm (1.30 am IST). Fauja – the oldest torch-bearer at London 2012 – would carry the torch on the 64th day of the Olympics Torch Relay when it reaches Newham.

The Olympic Stadium is also located at Newham. The langar would be organised by United Sikhs – an organisation dedicated to promoting the Sikh identity and tenets.
‘We are proud to share with the public the 500-yearold Sikh tradition of serving free meals,’ Parvinder Kaur, who would manage the langar project, said.

She said that the Sikhs from the UK and around the world would be participating in celebrations. They would show the world how the community embraced diversity.

‘We hope to demonstrate through the langar how the community involves itself in selfless service.

 

‘We will be serving thousands of free vegetarian meals along the route,’ she said. ‘It would also showcase how community food can bring people from all walks of life together.’
Paul Uppal, MP for Wolverhampton South West, said he always believed in promoting the society as a Sikh and as a Conservative.
‘I am looking forward to seeing gurdwaras from all over the country come together to serve others in the name of faith and community.’

The people serving the langar would wear yellow Tshirts carrying Fauja’s image.

t-shirt designed for Langar

t-shirt designed for Langar

The langar would be served at several service points in each of the five boroughs – each serving at least 1,000 vegetarian roti rolls within two hours.

Fifteen gurdwaras from South and East London have already granted their consent for participating in the event.

The organisation also demonstrated how to prepare roti rolls – an improvised version of cooked mixed vegetable filled in rotis made of whole wheat flour and plain flour.

An executive chef has already taught volunteers how to prepare roti rolls. Sources said several Sikhs from India also plan to reach London to support the project.