Khalsa – Birth of Sikh

Khalsa – Birth of Sikhs (Vaisakhi)

Panj Piare

Panj Piare

 

Khalsa was founded by Sikh’s tenth Guru – Guru Gobind Singh Ji in 1699 on the day of VAISAKHI.
On 30th March 1699 Guru Gobin Singh Ji requested his followers to congregate at Anandpur Sahib. Guru Ji had a small tent pitched on a small hill called Kesgarh Sahib. Guru Ji then said that today he need something from his followers, then drawing his sword Guru Ji asked for a volunteer who was willing to sacrifice his head.
No one came forward either on his first or second call but on Guru Ji’s third call Bhai Daya Ram came forward, Guru Ji took Bhai Daya Ram into the tent and then came outside again to ask for another Volunteer, this happened until Guru Ji got 5 followers.
In the tent Guru Ji poured clear water into an iron bowl and added Patashas (Punjabi sweeteners) into the water, which was stirred with double-edged sword accompanied with recitations from Adi Granth.
This mixture is called Amrit (Nectar). Guru Ji gave Amrit to the five volunteers who were willing to sacrifice their lives for their Guru, and were given the title of PANJ PIARE (the five beloved ones) by Guru Gobin Singh Ji.

The first five Sikhs of the Khalsa: Bhai Daya Singh, Bhai DHaram Singh, Bhai Himmat Singh, Bhai Mohkam Singh and Bhai Sahib Singh.

Guru Ji then had Amrit from Panj Piare and became Guru Gobin Singh Ji from Guru Gobin Rai Ji.

Guru Gobin Singh Ji having Amrit from Panj Piare

Guru Gobin Singh Ji having Amrit from Panj Piare

Guru Gobin Singh Ji then recited a line which has been the rallying-cry of the Khalsa since then: Waheguru ji ka Khalsa, Waheguru ji ki Fateh (Khalsa belongs to God, victory belongs to God)

Guru Gobind Singh Ji gave the title of SINGH(lion) to male and and Kaur(lioness/princess) to females. There are 5 K’s which should be observed as a pledge of dedication to Khalsa:

1) Kesh: uncut hair is a symbol of acceptance of your form as God intended it to be.
2) Kangha: a wooden comb, a symbol of cleanliness to keep one’s body and soul clean.
3) Kara: an iron or steel bracelet worn on the forearm, to inspire one to do good things and also used in self-defense.
4) Kacchera: undergarment reminding one to live a virtuous life and desist from rape or other sexual exploitation.
5) Kirpan: a sword to defend oneself and protect other people regardless of religion, race or creed.

 

Guru Gobind Singh’s respect for the Khalsa is best represented in one of his poems:

” All the battles I have won against tyranny

I have fought with the devoted backing of the people;
Through them only have I been able to bestow gifts,
Through their help I have escaped from harm;
The love and generosity of these Sikhs
Have enriched my heart and home.
Through their grace I have attained all learning;
Through their help in battle I have slain all my enemies.
I was born to serve them, through them I reached eminence.
What would I have been without their kind and ready help?

 

Little Khalsa

Little Khalsa

 

There are millions of insignificant people like me.
True service is the service of these people.
I am not inclined to serve others of higher caste:
Charity will bear fruit in this and the next world,
If given to such worthy people as these;
All other sacrifices are and charities are profitless.
From toe to toe, whatever I call my own,
All I possess and carry, I dedicate to these people.”

 

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